World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

Monitoring Temporal Patterns of Vertical Hyporheic Flux Via Distributed Temperature Sensors : Volume 368, Issue 368 (07/05/2015)

By Su, X.

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0003992337
Format Type: PDF Article :
File Size: Pages 6
Reproduction Date: 2015

Title: Monitoring Temporal Patterns of Vertical Hyporheic Flux Via Distributed Temperature Sensors : Volume 368, Issue 368 (07/05/2015)  
Author: Su, X.
Volume: Vol. 368, Issue 368
Language: English
Subject: Science, Proceedings, International
Collections: Periodicals: Journal and Magazine Collection (Contemporary), Copernicus GmbH
Historic
Publication Date:
2015
Publisher: Copernicus Gmbh, Göttingen, Germany
Member Page: Copernicus Publications

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Li, W., Wu, G., Lu, C., Shu, L., Wang, X., Su, X.,...Wang, G. (2015). Monitoring Temporal Patterns of Vertical Hyporheic Flux Via Distributed Temperature Sensors : Volume 368, Issue 368 (07/05/2015). Retrieved from http://worldlibrary.in/


Description
Description: College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing, 210098, China. Hyporheic exchange is of great significance for evaluating and developing water resources, as well as protecting ecosystem health. Temperature monitoring is one of the powerful tools for recognizing the hyporheic flux with high precision, low cost and great convenience. The streambed temperature at different depths (0 to 1.00 m), and the air and stream water temperatures at Dawen River, Jining City, were monitored using distributed temperature sensors (DTS). The temperature series were used to estimate the hyporheic flux through the analytical solution of the governing one-dimensional heat transport equation. The temporal patterns of flux along the vertical profile were analysed. The results indicated that surface water and air temperatures fluctuated approximately sinusoidally, and the groundwater temperature was relatively stable over time. The hyporheic flux at different depths showed different temporal patterns. Moreover, the dynamic curves of hyporheic flux were depth-dependent and probably controlled by the stream water level and groundwater field.

Summary
Monitoring temporal patterns of vertical hyporheic flux via distributed temperature sensors

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • Erosion Depth of Sand from an Immobile G... (by )
  • The Costs and Efficacy of Sediment Mitig... (by )
  • Estimation of Lacustrine Groundwater Dis... (by )
  • Process Oriented Thinking as a Key for I... (by )
  • Effects of Minor Drainage Networks on Fl... (by )
  • New Monitoring Technique for Rapid Inves... (by )
  • Distributed Soil Loss Estimation System ... (by )
  • Changing Trends of Rainfall and Sediment... (by )
  • Preface: Hs02 – Hydrologic Non-stationar... (by )
  • Projecting Future Climate Change Effects... (by )
  • Operational Tools to Help Stakeholders t... (by )
  • Quantification, Analysis and Modelling o... (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.