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Sapho : An Opera

By: Emile Augier

Excerpt: ACT I. At Olympia. A square before the temple of Jupiter. At the back, on one side of the stage the temple whose facade and steps are presented as facing the audience. AT RISE, the crowd is proceeding in procession toward the temple. PROCESSIONAL CHORUS: O Jupiter, if you are pleased by games, By sacred games that celebrate Olympia, Don't permit the triumph of impiety; Don't allow the courageous to be shamed! (Enter the procession of an Athletic Victor.) VICTOR?...

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Mars

By: Percival Lowell

AMID the seemingly countless stars that on a clear night spangle the vast dome overhead, there appeared last autumn to be a new-comer, a very large and ruddy one, that rose at sunset through the haze about the eastern horizon. That star was the planet Mars, so conspicuous when in such position as often to be taken for a portent. Large as he then looked, however, he is in truth but a secondary planet traveling round a secondary sun; but his interest for us is out of all p...

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One of Ours

By: Willa Sibert Cather

Claude Wheeler opened his eyes before the sun was up and vigorously shook his younger brother, who lay in the other half of the same bed. Ralph, Ralph, get awake! Come down and help me wash the car. What for? Why, aren't we going to the circus today? Car's all right. Let me alone. The boy turned over and pulled the sheet up to his face, to shut out the light which was beginning to come through the curtainless windows.

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The Only Thing Necessary : A Midnight Sentinel Adventure

By: Jens H. Altmann

Excerpt: Danny Templeton looked small and vulnerable in his hospital bed. The boy was asleep. The only sounds were his breathing, the hiss of the oxygen supply and the muffled sobs of his mother.

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Sonnets from the Portuguese, And Other Poems

By: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Excerpt: I thought once how Theocritus had sung Of the sweet years, the dear and wished?for years, Who each one in a gracious hand appears To bear a gift for mortals, old or young: And, as I mused it in his antique tongue, I saw, in gradual vision through my tears, The sweet, sad years, the melancholy years, Those of my own life, who by turns had flung A shadow across me. Straightway I was ?ware, So weeping, how a mystic Shape did move Behind me, and drew me backward by ...

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A Terrible Secret. A Novel

Excerpt: Chapter 1. BRIDE AND BRIDEGROOM ELECT. Firelight falling on soft velvet carpet, where white lily buds trail along azure ground, on chairs of white?polished wood that glitters like ivory, with puffy of seats of blue satin; on blue and gilt panelled walls; on a wonderfully carved oaken ceiling; on sweeping draperies of blue satin and white lace; on half a dozen lovely pictures; on an open piano; and last of all, on the handsome, angry face of a girl who stands before it?Inez Catheron.

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The Memoirs of Louis XV/Xvi, Volume 4

By: Madame du Hausset

SECTION V. The accession of Louis XVI. and Marie Antoinette to the crown of France took place (May 10, 1774) under the most propitious auspices! After the long, corrupt reign of an old debauched Prince, whose vices were degrading to himself and to a nation groaning under the lash of prostitution and caprice, the most cheering changes were expected from the known exemplariness of his successor and the amiableness of his consort. Both were looked up to as models of goodnes...

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Marriage a la Mode

By: Katherine Mansfield

ON his way to the station William remembered with a fresh pang of disappointment that he was taking nothing down to the kiddies. Poor little chaps! It was hard lines on them. Their first words always were as they ran to greet him, What have you got for me, daddy? and he had nothing. He would have to buy them some sweets at the station. But that was what he had done for the past four Saturdays; their faces had fallen last time when they saw the same old boxes produced again.

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The Pension Beaurepas

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1. I was not rich ? on the contrary; and I had been told the Pension Beaurepas was cheap. I had, moreover, been told that a boarding? house is a capital place for the study of human nature. I had a fancy for a literary career, and a friend of mine had said to me, ?If you mean to write you ought to go and live in a boarding?house; there is no other such place to pick up material.? I had read something of this kind in a letter addressed by Stendhal to his ...

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Essays on Work and Culture

By: Hamilton Wright Mabie

Excerpt: If he is a man of business, he must turn a deaf ear to the voices of art; if he writes prose, he must not permit himself the delight of writing verse; if he uses the pen, he must not use the voice. If he ventures to employ two languages for his thought, to pour his energy into two channels, the awful judgment of superficiality falls on him like a decree of fate.

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Recollections of My Childhood

By: Louisa May Alcott; 1832-1888

One of my earliest memories is of playing with books in my father's study, — building towers and bridges of the dictionaries, looking at pictures, pretending to read, and scribbling on blank pages whenever pen or pencil could be found. Many of these first attempts at authorship still exist; and I often wonder if these childish plays did not influence my after-life, since books have been my greatest comfort, castle-building a a never-failing delight, and scribbling a very profitable amusement.

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The Ghost at Massingham Mansions

By: Ernest Bramah

As public nuisances—or private ones for that matter, replied his friend. So long as they are content to behave as ghosts I am with them. When they begin to meddle with a state of existence that is outside their province—to interfere in business matters and depreciate property—to rattle chains, bang doors, ring bells, predict winners and to edit magazines and to attract attention instead of shunning it, I cease to believe. My sympathies are entirely with the sensible old ...

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Last of the Barons

By: Edward Bulwer Lytton

Excerpt: DEDICATORY EPISTLE. I dedicate to you, my indulgent Critic and long?tried Friend, the work which owes its origin to your suggestion. Long since, you urged me to attempt a fiction which might borrow its characters from our own Records, and serve to illustrate some of those truths which History is too often compelled to leave to the Tale?teller, the Dramatist, and the Poet. Unquestionably, Fiction, when aspiring to something higher than mere romance, does not perv...

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The Landlord at Lions Head, Volume 2

By: William Dean Howells

Jackson kept his promise to write to Westover, but he was better than his word to his mother, and wrote to her every week that winter. I seem just to live from letter to letter. It's ridic'lous, she said to Cynthia once when the girl brought the mail in from the barn, where the men folks kept it till they had put away their horses after driving over from Lovewell with it. The trains on the branch road were taken off in the winter, and the post-office at the hotel was dis...

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The Story of Creation as Told by Theology and by Science

By: T. S. Ackland

The History of the Creation with which the Bible commences, is not a mere incidental appendage to God's Revelation, but constitutes the foundation on which the whole of that Revelation is based. Setting forth as it does the relation in which man stands to God as his Maker, and to the world which God formed for his abode, it forms a necessary introduction to all that God has seen fit to reveal to us with reference to His dispensations of Providence and of Grace.

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The Crimson Fairy Book

By: Andrew Lang, M.A.

Excerpt: Each Fairy Book demands a preface from the Editor, and these introductions are inevitably both monotonous and unavailing. A sense of literary honesty compels the Editor to keep repeating that he is the Editor, and not the author of the Fairy Tales, just as a distinguished man of science is only the Editor, not the Author of Nature. Like nature, popular tales are too vast to be the creation of a single modern mind.

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Lazarus

By: Emile Zola

A deep and savage grotto. To the left, through an opening, a ray of light falls through a narrow gorge. Some blocks of rocks have rolled into the midst of the grotto. It's against one of these rocks that Lazarus' tomb is found; a simple opening hollowed into the earthen rock which is covered with a heavy slab. CHORUS: Lazarus is dead O Jesus, and we've been weeping for him four the last four days, despairing, all of us, his friends. Here's the tomb where we laid him with...

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The Brown Fairy Book

By: Andrew Lang, Editor

PREFACE: The stories in this Fairy Book come from all quarters of the world. For example, the adventures of 'Ball-Carrier and the Bad One' are told by Red Indian grandmothers to Red Indian children who never go to school, nor see pen and ink. 'The Bunyip' is known to even more uneducated little ones, running about with no clothes at all in the bush, in Australia. You may see photographs of these merry little black fellows before their troubles begin, in 'Northern Races o...

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The Heart of Rome

By: Francis Marion Crawford

Excerpt: Chapter One. The Baroness Volterra drove to the Palazzo Conti in the heart of Rome at nine o?clock in the morning, to be sure of finding Donna Clementina at home. She had tried twice to telephone, on the previous afternoon, but the central office had answered that ?the communication was interrupted.? She was very anxious to see Clementina at once, in order to get her support for a new and complicated charity. She only wanted the name, and expected nothing else, ...

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Diary of a Soldier of Fortune

By: Stanley Portal Hyatt

Excerpt: Chapter One. The vessel on which I left England the first time was and I believe is still one of the finest and fastest sailing ships ever launched. She had been built in the days when the cargo?tank was still a horror of the future, and she held the record from the Cape to Melbourne, having made the run in seventeen days. True, she had done the feat by accident, involuntarily, having been unable to heave to; but the fact of her achievement remains. However, whe...

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